International Migrants Day’s theme: Safe Migration in a World on the Move

“Migration has always been with us. Climate change, demographics, instability, growing inequalities, and aspirations for a better life, as well as unmet needs in labour markets, mean it is here to stay. The answer is effective international cooperation in managing migration to ensure that its benefits are most widely distributed, and that the human rights of all concerned are properly protected.” These are the words of UN Secretary-General António Guterres ahead of International Migrants Day (December 18). The 2017 theme is: Safe Migration in a World on the Move.

Did you know that at the end of 2015, more than 65 million people worldwide had been forcibly displaced and 86% of them were hosted in developing countries? You can read more information on common myths about refugees in Human development report 2016. The Human Development Report 2016 ’Human Development for Everyone’ looks also into the question: Who has been left behind and why?

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On September 19, 2016 the United Nations General Assembly adopted a set of commitments during its first ever summit on large movements of refugees and migrants to enhance the protection of refugees and migrants. These commitments are known as the New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants (NY Declaration). The NY Declaration reaffirms the importance of the international protection regime and represents a commitment by Member States to strengthen and enhance mechanisms to protect people on the move. It paves the way for the adoption of two new global compacts in 2018: the global compact on refugees and the global compact for safe, orderly and regular migration.

Written by: Boba Markovič Baluchová; + HDR office, UN office

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About Media about Development

Writing and reporting about international development topics; development cooperation projects, community development success stories and global challenges (in Slovak and also in English language)
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